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The Therapy Sessions
Friday, June 13, 2003
 
This editorial explains corruption in Africa as well as anything can.

There is cultural imperative for a young African who achieves a position of power: pay back my "sababus" (the people who gave me help along the way).

This sounds nice. But it is such a strong obligation. The man must use whatever means available to him to pay back his debts. There is no crime seen in stealing (from others or from the state) because he is fulfilling his contract to something more important - tribe and family.

This is how tribal sociaties work (or, actually, fail to work).




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