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The Therapy Sessions
Wednesday, October 27, 2004
 

The vanishing middle class


A Poverty Issue Left Untouched:
Let's examine the Census numbers. They certainly don't indicate that, over any reasonable period, middle-class living standards have stagnated. Mostly, the middle class is getting richer. Consider: In 2003, 44 percent of U.S. households had before-tax incomes exceeding $50,000; about 15 percent had incomes of more than $100,000 (they're included in the 44 percent). In 1990, the comparable figures were 40 percent and 10 percent. In 1980, they were 35 percent and 6 percent. All comparisons are adjusted for inflation.

If John Kerry says it enough, the media quickly accept it as truth.

Don't confront them with the facts! They are on a roll!


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